Home > 2013, 32(12) > The morphotectonics and its evolutionary dynamics of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (49° to 51°E)

Citation: LIANG Yuyang, LI Jiabiao, LI Shoujun, RUAN Aiguo, NI Jianyu, YU Zhiteng and ZHU Lei, . The morphotectonics and its evolutionary dynamics of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (49° to 51°E). ACTA OCEANOLOGICA SINICA, 2013, 32(12): 87-95. doi: 10.1007/s13131-013-0394-1

2013, 32(12): 87-95. doi: 10.1007/s13131-013-0394-1

The morphotectonics and its evolutionary dynamics of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (49° to 51°E)

1.  Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China
2.  University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
3.  Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences, the Second Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Hangzhou 310012, China
4.  China Ocean Mineral Resources Research and Development Association, Beijing 100860, China

Received Date: 2013-05-12
Accepted Date: 2013-08-18

Fund Project: a Project Funded by the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions.A project of the Mega-Science Program supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China: "Land-ocean boundary processes and their impacts on the formation of the Yangtze deposition system" under contract No. 2013CB956500

The morphotectonic features and their evolution of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are discussed on the base of the high-resolution full-coverage bathymetric data on the ridge between 49°-51°E. A comparative analysis of the topographic features of the axial and flank area indicates that the axial topography is alternated by the ridge and trough with en echelon pattern and evolved under a spatial-temporal migration especially in 49°-50.17°E. It is probably due to the undulation at the top of the mantle asthenosphere, which is propagating with the mantle flow. From 50.17° to 50.7°E, is a topographical high terrain with a crust much thicker than the global average of the oceanic crust thickness. Its origin should be independent of the spreading mechanism of ultra-slow spreading ridges. The large numbers of volcanoes in this area indicate robust magmatic activity and may be related to the Crozet hot spot according to RMBA (residual mantle Bouguer anomaly). The different geomorphological feature between the north and south flanks of the ridge indicates an asymmetric spreading, and leading to the development of the OCC (oceanic core complex). The tectonic activity of the south frank is stronger than the north and is favorable to develop the OCC. The first found active hydrothermal vent in the SWIR at 37°47'S, 49°39'E is thought to be associated with the detachment fault related to the OCC.

Key words: ultra-slow spreading , multibeam bathymetry , morphotectonics , oceanic core complex , Southwest Indian Ridge

The morphotectonic features and their evolution of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are discussed on the base of the high-resolution full-coverage bathymetric data on the ridge between 49°-51°E. A comparative analysis of the topographic features of the axial and flank area indicates that the axial topography is alternated by the ridge and trough with en echelon pattern and evolved under a spatial-temporal migration especially in 49°-50.17°E. It is probably due to the undulation at the top of the mantle asthenosphere, which is propagating with the mantle flow. From 50.17° to 50.7°E, is a topographical high terrain with a crust much thicker than the global average of the oceanic crust thickness. Its origin should be independent of the spreading mechanism of ultra-slow spreading ridges. The large numbers of volcanoes in this area indicate robust magmatic activity and may be related to the Crozet hot spot according to RMBA (residual mantle Bouguer anomaly). The different geomorphological feature between the north and south flanks of the ridge indicates an asymmetric spreading, and leading to the development of the OCC (oceanic core complex). The tectonic activity of the south frank is stronger than the north and is favorable to develop the OCC. The first found active hydrothermal vent in the SWIR at 37°47'S, 49°39'E is thought to be associated with the detachment fault related to the OCC.

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The morphotectonics and its evolutionary dynamics of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (49° to 51°E)

LIANG Yuyang, LI Jiabiao, LI Shoujun, RUAN Aiguo, NI Jianyu, YU Zhiteng and ZHU Lei,