Home > 2019, 38(8) > Changes in the population structure of Calanus sinicus during summer–autumn in the southern Yellow Sea

Citation: Yongqiang Shi, Song Sun, Chaolun Li, Guangtao Zhang, Bo Yang, Peng Ji. Changes in the population structure of Calanus sinicus during summer–autumn in the southern Yellow Sea. ACTA OCEANOLOGICA SINICA, 2019, 38(8): 56-63. doi: 10.1007/s13131-019-1435-1

2019, 38(8): 56-63. doi: 10.1007/s13131-019-1435-1

Changes in the population structure of Calanus sinicus during summer–autumn in the southern Yellow Sea

1.  CAS Key Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China
2.  Key Laboratory of Sustainable Development of Marine Fisheries of Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China
3.  Jiaozhou Bay National Marine Ecosystem Research Station, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China
4.  Laboratory for Marine Ecology and Environmental Science, Pilot National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology (Qingdao), Qingdao 266237, China
5.  University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
6.  Center for Ocean Mega Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China

Corresponding author: Song Sun, sunsong@qdio.ac.cn

Received Date: 2018-09-06
Web Publishing Date: 2019-08-01

Fund Project: The NSFC-Shandong Joint Fund for Marine Ecology and Environmental Sciences under contract No. U1606404; the National Natural Science Foundation of China under contract No. 41230963; the National Basic Research Program (973 program) of China under contract Nos 2011CB403604 and G1999043708; the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences under contract No. XDA11020305.

Calanus sinicus is a calanoid copepod widely distributed in coastal waters of China and Japan, and over-summering strategies may have major impacts on their population dynamics which in turn affect local marine food web structure. The abundance, stage composition, and sex composition of the planktonic copepod C. sinicus were studied from August to October 2002 in the southern Yellow Sea to understand how its population recovers from the over-summering state. Results showed that C. sinicus had low reproduction in August due to high temperature, except in waters near the Cheju Island with rich food and moderate bottom temperature, but the reproduction rates here decreased in September–October as food availability declined. When temperature dropped in September–October, C. sinicus actively propagated in coastal shallow waters. However, reproduction rates of C. sinicus individuals inhabiting the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM) remained low during the three months of the study. The percentage of C. sinicus females was high during the reproductive period, which suggests that the sex composition of adult C. sinicus may reflect whether or not the population is in the reproductive mode. Numerous fifth copepodite stage (CV) C. sinicus aggregated in the YSCWM in a suspended developmental stage during the three months of this study, and they potentially served as the parental individuals for population development when conditions became optimal for reproduction later in the year.

Key words: Calanus sinicus , stage composition , sex composition , population structure , Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass , life history strategy

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Changes in the population structure of Calanus sinicus during summer–autumn in the southern Yellow Sea

Yongqiang Shi, Song Sun, Chaolun Li, Guangtao Zhang, Bo Yang, Peng Ji